5 years ago I composed a blog post about the Roman fort and medieval church of Caerhun.

I want to come back to it now after half a decade in order to reflect on how this isolated church retains its potential use for worship, and yet simultaneously has effectively incorporated a rich and varied series of heritage displays.

There remains the display board by the car park, outside the churchyard walls…

Then, in the lychgate and already present 5 years ago are a series of displays about the Roman fort.

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Inside, there is the oldest board about the church.

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This board is joined by the church guide, which does contain some brief words about the memorials (see below).

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In addition, there are a series of new display boards on the south wall just inside the church’s west end. They provide a broad timeline of the medieval and modern history of the church.

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In the south chapel there are further display boards about the Roman phase of the site: four in total.

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In addition, there is a small digital display with a virtual reconstruction of the Roman fort.

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This is informally augmented by brand-new drone photographs from the summer of 2018 (I suspect thanks to CPAT’s Mark Walters) showing new details regarding the Roman fort and its extramural settlement.

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This host of heritage features – permanent and temporary – do not impose or dominate the small church space. As such, they reveal the potential of churches to integrate rich and detailed multimedia heritage displays through detailed yet still relatively discrete interventions into the traditional church and churchyard space.

IMG_4221Yet all this information does afford a sense of what is still missing. There remains no  review of the post-medieval memorials within the church, and indeed no detailed narrative regarding the historic churchyard beyond the handful of military gravestones discussed in the lychgate. These dimensions are left to largely speak for themselves…

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