Previously I’ve posted on a dark and dismal archaeodeath dimension to the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct in the Vale of Llangollen, using a personal tragedy and its memorial as the focus of a broader reflection about the communities around this World Heritage Site. I’ve also addressed the aqueduct’s archaeology, art and architecture here and here.

In this post, I wish to simply add a perspective from a recent walk from Ty Mawr country park to the aqueduct. This was my first time of seeing the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct from below.

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The walk symbol of Ty Mawr includes a stylised railway viaduct (above), but no allusion to the aqueduct to its west. Yet, at the start of the walk, where it departs from the circular route around the country park, there is a bench that is carved to mirror the aqueduct: a further example of how art links industrial heritage to the walking experience.

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Beyond this striking sculpture, I didn’t encounter any explicit memorials but I do wish to share the amazing views up the Dee of the aqueduct.

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Up close, the magnitude of the engineering feat of sending a canal over the River Dee starts to sink in.

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